Blogs

Moulana Zaki Baqri of Alipur, Karnataka & Toronto, Canada

"Death to Zionism" Mohammed Zaki Baqri in a speech at SABA Mosque of San Jose, California

Zaki Baqri

Zaki Baqri (Legal name: Mohammed Zaki Baqri) is an Indian Khomeinist Judeophobic extremist imam extraordinaire based in Toronto, Canada. Like the infamous Nabi Raza Mir Abidi of Shia Association of Bay Area (Saba Mosque of San Jose), Zaki was born and raised in Alipur, the ultra-Khomeinist town located in Karnataka, India. In fact, the notorious duo are relatives as Nabi Raza is married to Zaki's niece, Syeda Zahera. Both Faqihi mullahs are also supposedly syeds (so they claim!), as such they are cousins who belong to the global Bani Hashem clan, of whom rogue members are openly seeking to terrorize, dominate, and rule the world (think: The Protocols of the Learned Elders of Bani Hashem ©)!

Learn more about Zaki Baqri...

The Convergence of Paganism and Islam in India

Devotees at a shrine at Solapur in western India's Maharastra observed a bizarre ritual of throwing infants for good health from a height of 50 feet on to a cloth sheet held below on Tuesday, April 29, 2008.

Video: Hostage John Limbert Speaking with Ali Khamenei

This fascinating video came to our attention yesterday.  It shows Ambassaor John Limbert, at the time a hostage in the U.S. Embassy, speaking with Ali Khamenei, then Iran’s Deputy Defense Minister (subsequently President and currently the Supreme Leader).  Just this morning, Ambassador Limbert — a NIAC advisory board member — joined us at our Capitol Hill conference for a panel assessing Obama’s diplomacy with Iran, but this is an amazing look at his experience thirty years ago today.

For non-Farsi speakers, the exchange between Limbert and Khamenei here is incredibly interesting.  To paraphrase: Limbert politely welcomed Khamenei, who was being treated as a guest since he was visiting the hostages at their “residence” where they were being held.  Limbert remarked about the Iranian cultural quirk known as “taarof,” which characterizes the uniquely Iranian version of hospitality, saying: Iranians are too hospitable to guests in their country, when we insist that we must be going, you all tell us “no, no, you must stay.”

When Limbert pressed the matter further, Khamenei revealed that the real issue was the United States’ willingness to allow the deposed Shah to enter into the country for medical treatment.  When the US returns the Shah to Iran so the revolutionary government can prosecute him, Khamenei explained, then the hostages will be allowed to leave.

For those old enough to remember the hostage crisis as it happened, this will surely evoke strong memories from that period thirty years ago.  But for the rest of us, this is an amazingly personal glimpse into the ordeal that held the world’s attention for so long, and for which all of us are still dealing with the repercussions.

Article Source: niacINsight

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - blogs